📢 Our response to COVID-19: We're offering free coding classes and programming between now and the end of summer. Learn more.

One-of-a-Kind Virtual Summer Camps

Tech Taster | Music + Tech | Creative Tech + Design | Quantum Computing

For students grades 3-12 and university students

WE MAKE CODING FUN!

Taught by industry professionals

...all from the comfort of your home


This summer, delve in-depth into cutting edge tech fields rarely taught to students with live instruction and small group support.

Hands-on projects
1-2 week-long camps
Online, live small group instruction

Camps created in partnership with engineers at:

Microsoft Disney Google Harvard MIT Stanford Brown University

General Information about Camps

Camps meet daily Monday through Friday from 9am-3pm PST. There will be breaks throughout the day and for lunch.

For most camps, there will lectures in the morning (length will vary based on grade level and experience), and in the afternoons, students will be in small groups (8-12 students) with a personal instructor, where they will work on hands-on activities and projects.

For all camps, students will be put into groups based on grade level and skill level.

All camps are online with live instruction.

Tech Taster

Our signature virtual summer camp! Learn AI, Cybersecurity, Healthcare & Tech, and more

June 15 - 26, 2020

Music & Tech

Learn the music coding language only taught to Stanford & Princeton students!

June 29 - July 3, 2020

Creative Tech

Learn about UI/UX, Product Design & more! Find your creative side!

July 6 - 10, 2020

Quantum Computing

Be one of the only high school students in the country learning quantum computing!

July 13 - 17, 2020

About the Camp

This is a jam packed two-week camp, in which students will be introduced to the breadth and depth of computer science. Students will learn the fundamentals of coding plus develop knowledge and coding skills in cutting-edge tech fields, such as AI and Healthcare+Tech. Each day is filled with hands-on activities and project building, allowing students to gain real skills and work together in a collaborative environment.


What Students Learn

The purpose of the Tech Taster is for students to develop foundational coding skills and gain exposure to various fields of computer science. In the first week, students focus on learning the fundamentals of coding in the programming language, Python - one of the most widely used programming languages. They will learn concepts fundamental to all programming languages, including variables, conditionals, booleans, loops, functions, and more.

In Week Two, students apply the coding skills they learned in Week 1 in a variety of cutting-edge tech fields. Each day, they learn about a different field and work on hands-on activities and projects in the given field. On the final day of the camp, they choose the field that most interests them and work on an in-depth programming project.

The fields they will be exposed to each day are:


AI
Artificial Intelligence
Cybersecurity
Cybersecurity
Healthcare + Tech
Healthcare + Tech
Web development
Web Development + Design

Girls learning how to code

Logistics

Grades

Incoming 6th - 12th
Students will be divided into small groups based on grade and skill level.

Dates

Two-week camp: June 15 - 26, 2020
Students will meet daily Monday - Friday, 9am-3pm PST

Prerequisites

None

Cost

$295/weekly

About the Camp

Create orchestras - no instruments needed!

Every industry has adopted the strengths of computer science; however, have you ever thought about the applications that coding could bring to music? The intersection between coding and music has been explored for more than two decades, bringing technology increasingly into the limelight of the music industry. At the forefront of this field are Stanford and Princeton Universities who together developed a music-specific programming language, ChucK. With ChucK, the possibility of truly intertwining these industries became a reality. This language gives the potential to code for 3-dimensional sound spaces, create full orchestral compositions, app development, and inventing new musical instruments.


What Students Learn

During this camp, students will learn coding concepts fundamental to all programming languages such as variables, conditionals, loops and functions all while they are learning the basic applications, terminology, and syntax of the ChucK programming language. They’ll create their own musical projects in ChucK from short compositions to full orchestras and even develop new instruments. This programming language is only taught at Stanford and Princeton Universities, so students participating in this camp will get an exclusive introduction rarely available to anyone outside of these universities.


Instructors

Trent Peltz

Trent Peltz, 3D Music Specialist

Trent Peltz is a graduate of Stanford University with a degree in Music, Science, and Technology. While at Stanford he conducted research to perfect audio quality for computers and phones and specialized in programming for sound environments, such as composing for 3-dimensional sound spaces, and creating musical instruments and interfaces.

Trent has interned with Fender Musical Instrument Corporation and worked at Warner Music Group as a Stanford|Warner Leadership Fellow. He has also had the honor of opening up for Guns N’ Roses on their 2018 European tour. While Trent is an avid musician, he is always trying to incorporate innovative technological ideas into his music. His passion is bringing people together and showing them all the ways music can positively impact their lives.

Read more


Girls learning how to code

Logistics

Grades

Incoming 6th - 12th
Students will be divided into small groups based on grade and skill level.

Dates

One-week camp: June 29 - July 3, 2020
Students will meet daily Monday - Friday, 9am-3pm PST

Prerequisites

None

Cost

$350

About the Camp

Love art and design? This is the camp for you! Students will use the programming languages, JavaScript and processing, to create interactive graphics, animations, games, and generative art. Students will build rich scenes, learning to craft color palettes and complex shapes. Students will explore movement and randomness, thinking critically about our interactions with technology. Through this session students will get a taste of what is possible with creative code – to explore, enchant, and connect.


What Students Learn

This is a project-based camp. Students will learn how to create art and animations with a UX/UI design focus. Depending on grade level, some of the projects students will learn to do using programming include:



Instructors

David Sasson

David Sasson, Creative Technologist

David Sasson is a creative technologist born and raised in the Bay Area. He holds a BA and MS in computer science from Brown University where he specialized in data visualization and human-computer interaction. Learn more about David and his projects on his website.


Happy kid learning how to code

Logistics

Grades

Incoming 3rd - 12th graders
Students will be divided into small groups based on grade and skill level.

Dates

One-week camp: July 6 - July 10, 2020
Students will meet daily Monday - Friday, 9am-3pm PST

Prerequisites

None

Cost

$350

About the Camp

Interested in physics, math, or programming? Be one of the first high school students in the world to learn about quantum computing from researchers at MIT and Harvard! In this intensive, week-long camp, students will be exposed to the field of quantum computing, including quantum mechanics, quantum information, and quantum algorithms. They will develop foundational skills in each of these areas through hands-on activities and simulations. By the end of the camp, students will build a quantum computer!


What Students Learn

In Day 1-2, students will be introduced to quantum mechanics, learning about the quantum model for atom, particle in a box, superposition, interference, and tunneling. They will learn how to run a quantum simulation using qutip, in which they will gain hands-on experience playing with the concepts of quantum mechanics.

In Day 3-4, they will learn about quantum information and computation, focusing on quantum circuits, qubits, and no cloning theorem. After learning foundational knowledge necessary for quantum computation, students will learn how to program a quantum teleportation protocol, in which they will teleport a quantum bit of information across the universe without physically moving it. Additionally, they will program a quantum computer using Python API. On Day 5, they will study quantum algorithms, learning about Grover and Shor’s algorithms, as well as near-term algorithms. They’ll conclude the course by working through Deutsch-Josza’s algorithm and using a quantum processor for the ground state of Hydrogen.

Some other topics covered will include: discrete probability, advanced math concepts such as Bra-Ket Notation and Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, Wave-Particle Duality and the Fundamental Postulates of Quantum Tunneling, and Qubit.


Instructors

Amir Karamluo

Amir Karamlou, MIT

Amir graduated from MIT with a B.S. in Physics and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and an M.Eng in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 2018. He is currently a graduate fellow in MIT's EECS department and a recipient of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. His research motivation is to use quantum mechanics to gain an advantage over current technology and protocols. As an undergraduate he worked with Dirk Englund on control and high fidelity readout of NV centers in diamond.

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Francisca Vasconcelos

Francisca Vasconcelos, MIT

Francisca Vasconcelos is currently a senior at MIT studying Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, and Physics. This fall, she will be pursuing ah MSc in Mathematics and Foundation of Computer Science at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. She has performed research in a variety of fields, ranging from optical communication for cubesats at NASA JPL to boosting neural network performance at the MIT Media Lab. However, Francisca has spent the last two years focused on quantum computing, working on quantum measurement, machine learning for quantum, error mitigation, and radiation studies as an undergraduate researcher in the MIT Engineering Quantum Systems group and as an intern at Rigetti Computing. Furthermore, Francisca is very interested in education, serving as a course instructor for MIT’s winter-term Intro to Quantum Computing course for two years and leading The Coding School’s quantum curriculum development team.

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Alexander Sanchez de la Cerda

Alexander Sanchez de la Cerda, Harvard University

Alexander is currently a fellow at Harvard University. There he is researching quantum algorithms and protocols in Prof. Prineha Narang’s lab. He studied Computer Science at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). His main areas of interest include machine learning and quantum computing, but he is also very active on the business side, having started the company Dots Development which is programming a dictation software for lawyers.

Originally, Alexander is from Vienna, a city he loves for its culture, diversity and cuisine. As you can guess he is not only a scientist, but also a foodie; loving to cook, and active in debating and previously also Model UN. Out of high school, he worked in Austrian Institute of Technology’s quantum cryptography laboratory. Later he lived in Switzerland, where during his studies he improved the investment firm Jolt Capital’s recommendation system through a work in conjunction with EPFL’s Artificial Intelligence (AI) laboratory. Currently he lives in the Boston area, where you can find him when he is not discovering new places — one of his big passions. For more information and contact details you can visit Alexander’s personal website: alexander.sanchez.at

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How to Apply

Due to the overwhelming interest in this camp and rigor of the material, students are required to submit a Statement of Interest when filling out the registration form.

The Statement of Interest should be 300 - 700 words detailing your interest in learning about quantum computing, your future aspirations and any experience or classes you have in science, math or technology.

Note: We do not expect students to have a strong background or understanding in quantum - or even STEM fields in general. We are looking for students with passion, interest and curiosity to learn more about this field.

Steps to Apply:
Students can upload their Statement of Interest when applying via the registration link below. Applicants are required to submit a deposit of $175.00 (half of the camp tuition). if your child is not selected, you will receive a full refund of your deposit. If your child is applying for a scholarship, no deposit will be required when applying. Applicants will be notified within seven (7) days of submission.


kids in a classroom

Logistics

Grades

Incoming 9th - 12th graders and university students
Exceptions will be made for advanced middle school students

Dates

One-week camp: July 13 - July 17, 2020
Students will meet daily Monday - Friday, 9am-3pm PST

Prerequisites

Algebra

Cost

$350